B.b. king - eric clapton worried life blues


A description of tropes appearing in Eric Clapton . Eric Patrick Clapton (born in Ripley, England on 30 March 1945) is one of those artists who can find great …

Three musicians from this lineup—bassist Carl Radle, keyboardist and singer Bobby Whitlock and drummer Jim Gordon—formed the nucleus of Clapton’s next band, Derek and the Dominos, who recorded the seminal Layla and Other Assorted Love Songs in the summer of 1970 and toured as a four-piece through August. The Dominos’ live shows were filled with long jams, and at nearly 15 minutes, “Why Does Love Got to Be So Sad?” was one of the longest, opening with an extended wah-infused funk workout. With stellar high-harmony vocals added by Whitlock, this four-piece emits a huge sound. Clapton’s first solo has all the fire, fury and melodicism of his greatest playing, his 1956 “Brownie” Stratocaster screaming pure virtuosity and conviction.

Biography used with permission from Where’s Eric! For more information about Eric Clapton's life and career, visit the Eric Clapton FAQ at .

In 1949, King began recording songs under contract with Los Angeles-based RPM Records . Many of King's early recordings were produced by Sam Phillips , who later founded Sun Records . Before his RPM contract, King had debuted on Bullet Records by issuing the single "Miss Martha King" (1949), which did not chart well. "My very first recordings [in 1949] were for a company out of Nashville called Bullet, the Bullet Record Transcription company," King recalled. "I had horns that very first session. I had Phineas Newborn on piano; his father played drums, and his brother, Calvin , played guitar with me. I had Tuff Green on bass, Ben Branch on tenor sax, his brother, Thomas Branch, on trumpet, and a lady trombone player. The Newborn family were the house band at the famous Plantation Inn in West Memphis." [24]

. continued to tour extensively, averaging over 250 concerts per year around the world. Classics such as “Payin’ The Cost To Be The Boss,” “The Thrill Is Gone,” How Blue Can You Get,” “Everyday I Have The Blues,” and “Why I Sing The Blues” are concert (and fan) staples. Over the years, the Grammy Award-winner has had two #1 R&B hits, 1951’s “Three O’Clock Blues,” and 1952’s “You Don’t Know Me,” and four #2 R&B hits, 1953’s “Please Love Me,” 1954’s “You Upset Me Baby,” 1960’s “Sweet Sixteen, Part I,” and 1966’s “Don’t Answer The Door, Part I.” .’s most popular crossover hit, 1970’s “The Thrill Is Gone,” went to #15 pop.

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Upon King’s death, Clapton posted a video to Facebook, saying King was “a beacon for all of us who love this kind of music.” That much is very clear in the above video.


B.B. King - Eric Clapton Worried Life BluesB.B. King - Eric Clapton Worried Life BluesB.B. King - Eric Clapton Worried Life BluesB.B. King - Eric Clapton Worried Life Blues

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